Welcome to the Lower Colorado River Multi-Species Conservation Program
Lower Colorado River Multi-Species Conservation Program Balancing Resource Use and Conservation

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Restoration Activities

      Other Conservation Measures

Flat-tailed horned lizard surveyors – Photo by ReclamationMohave Desert Tortoise habitat  – Photo by ReclamationConstruction of a new inlet canal to Topock Marsh on Havasu National Wildlife Refuge – Photo by Reclamation

LCR MSCP has three stand alone conservation and avoidance measures.  The two conservation measures require the acquisition of occupied, but unprotected habitats.  The avoidance measure seeks to minimize the impact on existing habitats at Topock Marsh which is located on Havasu National Wildlife Refuge.

Click on the arrows below to view these measures.

Desert Tortoise Conservation Measure

Conservation Measure DETO1 directs the program to acquire and protect a minimum of 230 acres of existing occupied desert tortoise habitat and donate purchased lands to resource agencies for permanent protection of species habitat to offset effects of the proposed actions covered under the program.  In consultation with our Steering Committee, private landowners were contacted within the Chuckwalla Bench Area of Critical Environmental Concern (ACEC) in Riverside County, California, east of Palm Springs, between the Chuckwalla Mountains and the Chocolate Mountains. 

With the written permission of the landowners, multiple parcels were surveyed to determine the presence or absence of desert tortoise.  After verifying the presence of desert tortoises, approximately 260 acres were appraised using the federal appraisal system.  In 2011, 260 acres of occupied and unprotected desert tortoise lands within the Chuckwalla Bench Desert Wildlife Area were purchased and gifted to the U.S. Bureau of Land Management for long-term management.  On August 18, 2011 the program received written concurrence from the USFWS that the conservation measure has been completed.

For additional information on this project, please refer to Work Task E29: Desert Tortoise.

Flat-Tailed Horned Lizard Conservation Measure

Conservation Measure FTHL1 directs the program to acquire and protect a minimum of 230 acres of existing occupied flat-tailed horned lizard habitat and donate purchased lands to resource agencies for permanent protection of species habitat to offset effects of the proposed actions covered under the program.  In consultation with our Steering Committee, private landowners were contacted within and adjacent to the Yuha Desert Area of Critical Environmental Concern (ACEC).

With the written permission of the landowners, multiple parcels were surveyed to determine the presence or absence of flat-tailed horned lizard.  After verifying the presence of flat tailed horned lizard, approximately 240 acres were appraised using the federal appraisal system.  In 2011 and 2012, 240 acres of occupied and unprotected flat-tailed horned lizard lands within the Yuha Desert Area were purchased and gifted to the U.S. Bureau of Land Management for long-term management.  In 2012 the program received written concurrence from the USFWS that the conservation measure has been completed.

For additional information on this project, please refer to Work Task E30: Flat-tailed Horned Lizard.

Topock Marsh

Avoidance & Minimization Measure (AMM2), is intended to avoid impacts on groundwater levels that support covered species habitat at Topock Marsh located at the Havasu National Wildlife Refuge.  Topock Marsh has been identified as an important area for LCR MSCP covered species such as Yuma clapper rail and the southwestern willow flycatcher. At times, flow-related activities could lower river elevations to levels that will disrupt existing gravitational diversions of water from the river to the marsh. The USFWS and the Bureau of Reclamation have combined resources to allow for construction of a new multi-purpose inlet canal and water control structures that divert water through both gravitational and pumped means which ensures the delivery of water to the marsh even when river elevations are low. It is anticipated that the gravitational diversion of river water, paired with supplemental pumping to maintain the water surface elevation of the marsh, would avoid negative effects on the groundwater elevation.

In FY2010, the LCR MSCP transferred $1,000,000 to the USFWS and fully satisfied the construction component of AMM2.  This agreement was confirmed via correspondence from the USFWS on August 23, 2010.  In FY2012, the LCR MSCP made an additional $2,500,000 available to the USFWS for completion of the pumping platform and to establish a long-term fund for maintenance of the canal and pump system.  This action hasl fulfilled any long-term maintenance obligations under AMM2.  In 2012 we received written concurrence from the USFWS that the avoidance measure has been completed.

For additional information on this project, please refer to Work Task E17: Topock Marsh Pumping.

Updated December 18, 2017