Welcome to the Lower Colorado River Multi-Species Conservation Program
Lower Colorado River Multi-Species Conservation Program Balancing Resource Use and Conservation
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Vegetation and Habitat

      Plant Species
Sticky buckwheat plant at the Virgin River Dunes in 2004 - Reclamation - Dianne BangleThreecorner milkvetch plant in fruit at Sandy Cover within Lake Mead National Recreation Area in 2008 - Reclamation - Dianne BangleThreecorner Milkvetch

The LCR MSCP provides conservation for two covered plants.

Covered Plants:

Native Species Used in Conservation Area Plantings:

Species Description Photo
Arrowweed Arrowweed (Pluchea sericea) is a rhizomatous shrub common to riparian areas in the Southwest U.S. and can form dense thickets. Arrowweed attracts many insects and provides cover for some wildlife species. Arrowweed - Photo by Reclamation
Coyote Willow Coyote willow (Salix exigua) is a large shrub that spreads readily by its roots and is dependent on ground water to survive. Coyote willow is naturally found along the flood plains of low elevation rivers and streams. This species, among others, provides important wildlife habitat, ecological diversity, bank and sediment stabilization,  and flood abatement. Coyote willow is resilient to disturbance from flooding and wildlife grazing. Coyote Willow - Photo by Reclamation
Desert Broom Desert broom (Baccharis sarothroides) is a woody, resinous, shrub found in dry and disturbed areas in the Southwest U.S. The stems of desert broom are green and its leaves are much reduced or absent much of the year. Desert broom plants provide cover for small ground dwelling animals and the flowers attract butterflies and bees. Desert Broom - Photo by Reclamation
Fremont Cottonwood Fremont Cottonwood (Populus fremontii) is a common riparian tree species dependent on groundwater and can reach up to 115 feet in height. Cottonwood is naturally found along the flood plains of low elevation rivers and streams. This species provides important wildlife habitat, ecological diversity, bank and sediment stabilization, and flood abatement. Fremont Cottonwood - Photo by Reclamation
Goodding's Willow Goodding's willow (Salix gooddingii) is a common riparian tree species, dependent on moist, wet habitat. Goodding's willow is naturally found along the flood plains of low elevation rivers and streams and can reach 100 feet in height. This species provides important wildlife habitat, ecological diversity, bank and sediment stabilization  and flood abatement. Fremont Cottonwood - Photo by Reclamation
Heliotrope Heliotrope (Heliotropium curassavicum) is a perennial herb common in the Southwest U.S. along shorelines and alkali flats. The stems are fleshy and leaves thick. Heliotrope is the plant most often used  by the  LCR MSCP covered species, MacNeill's sootywing, as a source of nectar. Heliotrope - Photo by Reclamation
Honey Mesquite Honey Mesquite (Prosopis glandulosa) is a shrub or tree that can reach up to 20 feet in height. Mesquite can have a beneficial effect on soil chemical and physical properties by increasing the amount of soil nitrogen beneath their canopies. Mesquites grow very quickly, can establish on a wide variety of soil types, can withstand drought, and provide food and habitat for wildlife. They are especially important in drier areas where other riparian trees cannot grow. HOney Mesquite at the Ahakav Tribal Preserve 2007 - Photo by Reclamation
Mule-Fat Mule-fat (Baccharis salicifolia) is a woody, often sticky, willow-like shrub that can reach heights up to 12 feet. It is common to dry stream beds and stream banks in the Southwest U.S. deserts. Mule-fat at the Cibola Nature Trail, Cibola National Wildlife Refuge 2010 - Photo by Reclamation
Quailbush Quailbush (Atriplex lentiformis) is a large shrub that is common in floodplains, thrives in hot, dry climates, and can fix atmospheric nitrogen. Quailbush is the sole food source for the larvae of the LCR MSCP species MacNeill's sootywing. Quailbrush at Cibola Island of Cibola National Wildlife Refuge April 2006 - Photo by Reclamation
Willow Baccharis Willow baccharis (Baccharis salicina) is a shrub found in wet areas, along streambanks and roadsides, and can reach heights up to 9 feet. This species is important to wildlife in that it provides shade, protection, and food. Willow baccharis is a key component to Southwest desert riparian understory habitat. Emory's baccharis (Baccharis emoryi) is synonymous with this species. Willow Baccharis - Photo by Reclamation

Updated December 18, 2017