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Lower Colorado River Multi-Species Conservation Program Balancing Resource Use and Conservation

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Outreach

      Information Article

A yellow-billed cuckoo that was captured in a net and banded in August 2008 fed a cicada prior to release back into cottonwood willow habitat on the Bill Williams National Wildlife Refuge, near Parker, AZ - Southern Sierra Research StationYuma Clapper Rail - USGS - Dr. Courtney ConwayA  yellow-billed cuckoo showing color bands on both legs for future identification in June 2009 at the Colorado River Indian Tribes 'Ahakhav Tribal Preserve, near Parker, AZ - Southern Sierra Research Station
  A yellow-billed cuckoo that was captured in a net and banded in August 2008 fed a cicada prior to release back into cottonwood willow habitat on the Bill Williams National Wildlife Refuge, near Parker, AZ - Southern Sierra Research Station   Yuma Clapper Rail - USGS - Dr. Courtney Conway   A yellow-billed cuckoo showing color bands on both legs for future identification in June 2009 at the Colorado River Indian Tribes 'Ahakhav Tribal Preserve, near Parker, AZ - Southern Sierra Research Station  


Migratory Bird Day!

Article by Nathan Leon

On Tuesday, November 21, 2017, LCR MSCP staff members Nathan Lenon, Barbara Raulston, and Jenny Smith participated in a migratory bird-themed event at Sunset Park in Henderson, NV, just outside of Las Vegas. The event was supported by several state, federal, and local agencies, with the intention of educating the public on allowing migrating birds to be wild by observing them from a distance, and not feeding or bothering them.

LCR MSCP’s staff members’ station included binoculars and spotting scopes used for bird viewing. They provided bird identification guides, as well as bird egg replicas, feathers, talons, and several life-sized 3D models of some endangered bird species, including the Yuma Clapper Rail and Yellow Billed Cuckoo.

Sunset Park has a large fishing lake which provides habitat for waterfowl. Some birds use the lake as a permanent home, while others use it as a stopover during their seasonal migrations, so this location is a good spot for bird watching.

These events give the LCR MSCP an opportunity to engage with the public and get people interested in learning about some of the wildlife species that live in urban areas, as well as discussing the Colorado River, both as a major source of water, but also as an important area for wildlife conservation.

Learn more and see photos from this event on the Las Vegas Review Journal's article here.

Updated January 3, 2018